Greens: PIP statistics reveal government’s “twisted priorities”

13 December 2017

Co-Leader of the Green Party Jonathan Bartley says the latest statistics [1] on the use of Personal Independence Payments (PIP) reveals the government's “twisted priorities”.

The annual statistics show that nearly half (47%) of claimants to the Disability Living Allowance element of PIP who had a reassessment this year either saw their allowance decreased or disallowed. The statistics reveal that 443,000 people will have had their claims reduced or removed.

Meanwhile a Freedom of Information request submitted by the party to the Department of Work and Pensions found that the amount paid to the private companies tasked with carrying out PIP assessment has increased by an average of 30% [2]. 

Bartley said:

“The Government is taking food from the mouths of disabled people while laying on a banquet for private companies. This comes only a week after Philip Hammond revealed his biases by labelling disabled people a drain on UK productivity. It shows just how twisted the Government's priorities have become.

“By slashing away at welfare, the Government is heading in totally the wrong direction. It is weaponising welfare against those it should help. It is time it recalibrated it’s moral compass and steered it’s policies in a new direction. We need a new, modern vision for the welfare state – one that removes barriers for those who want to work, while giving real choices and opportunity to everyone. It could start by piloting a universal basic income that supports every person, with extra payments made available to those – like the disabled –  ensuring everyone can lead the pursue the life they want.”

Notes

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/666525/pip-statistics-to-october-2017.pdf

[2]                              

 

13/14 Actuals

 

14/15 Actuals

 

15/16 Actuals

 

16/17 Actuals

IAS

 

£20,254,568

 

£128,482,423

 

£158,604,257

 

£199,985,576

 

CAPITA

 

£3,073,986

 

£61,371,930

 

£44,682,003

 

£66,797,479

 






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